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Posts Tagged ‘freedom of speech’

Everybody Draw Mohammed Day

Comedy should provoke! It should blast through prejudices, challenge preconceptions! Comedy should always leave you different than when it found you. Sure, humor can hurt, even alienate, but the risk is better than the alternative: a steady diet of innocuous, child-proof, flavorless mush! DEMAND to be challenged, to be offended, to be treated like thinking, reasoning adults! And raise your children to be the same. Don’t let a comedian, a network, a Congressional committee, or an evil genius take away your freedom to laugh at whatever you want.

—Duckman (Peace Be Upon Him)

Please, consider using your freedom of speech and join us for Everybody Draw Mohammed Day.

Good on you, Maine!

Lewiston, Maine Woman Facing Jail Over Book

Years ago, I used to work at a public library. I loved it. I love books and libraries. I bought massive quantities of stuff at every library sale and check out 10 or 15 books a week.

While I worked at the library, we had a group of religious nuts complain about one of these very same books, “It’s Perfectly Normal”. I looked the book over one time when I got a chance, and I can see why an uptight religious twit would hate it and everything it stands for. The book is educational in the extreme, valuing the passing along of knowledge above any bullshit pseudo-morality. The only kids that could get off on reading that book are the kids that had already been thoroughly warped by a religious upbringing. No healthy child is going to do anything with that book other than learn the things he or she needs to know to be a sexually responsible adult. Things that his or her church, school, and, sadly, probably even parents, are too uptight and afraid to pass along.

So now, this hateful crone has decided that she is to be the judge of what other people’s children read. Shame on you, JoAn Karkos. You have no moral authority over other people’s children. Back when I worked at the library, we had a lot of different kinds of people come through our doors. We had a lot of people who wouldn’t have objected to their children learning a healthy view of sexuality before reaching adulthood. All the better to plant a healthy view in their psyches than to let shame and guilt and fear spread their usual decay through such territory.

One thing that I remember clearly is that we had a very religious family who came to our library. They homeschooled their many children, as well as those of other like-minded people. I disagree with their religious views, as I did then. But this family was always polite, respectful, and treated our facility the way they would have treated their own home. Even the smallest of their children had been instilled with manners that would shame most adults in comparison. I often witnessed the mother (who usually brought the family in, but not always) going through the childrens’ book selections before they checked out. That is the only justifable place (if any exists at all) for moral policing. JoAn Karkos has no right to decide what those kids can and cannot read.

It’s up to the parents of all children to take the responsiblity to watch what goes into their children’s minds. These days, all too few parents take that responsibility seriously, if they take up the burden at all. To do less is reckless, irresponsible, and invites churchstate interference with the most basic right of all citizens, child and adult alike, to choose for themselves. Without that right, who can call themselves free?